August 2008 Newsletter

Who is the best candidate for the position?

 

This month’s tip keeps your interviews on track:

 

August 2008 Newsletter Image

With an abundance of talented candidates seeking jobs, the interview process plays an even more important role. Finding the right person to fill an open position is vital to the continued success of your organization. You want someone with the rightskills and someone who fits in with your team and believes in your mission.

Putting a hiring process into place before and during the interview will keep your organization on track to success.

 

Before the interview

What do you need? Tailor your questions to the position you are looking to fill. The right questions will help you determine if the candidate has the qualities you are looking for.

 

Advertise: Go beyond the basic newspaper ad for your search.

Culture clash? Consider what personality is a fit for your organization’s culture. Jot down questions to ask the candidate to see if he/she will fit in.

Time to talk: Talk to each candidate briefly via phone to narrow your list down. Also have your main managers or supervisors talk to the top candidates and use their feedback.

 

During the interview

Questions, questions: Stay focused during the interview with queries that matter. Uncover what a candidate’s skills are with the right questions.

Listen: As an interviewer you should take notes of what the candidate is saying and stay away from dominating the conversation.

Gut instinct: If you have pinpointed what you are looking for and asked the right questions, the decision should come naturally. If you aren’t sure if you should trust your intuition, ponder the decision a day or two.

 

A simple grid can also be a guide to help you gain a better perspective. With the candidates’ names on top and the job requirements on the side, rate each person on a scale of 1 to 5. The person with the highest rating is probably your best choice, but remember to factor in your team’s input and trust your overall judgment.  

This month’s tip was adapted from an article by Judith Lindenberger.

 

 

Are you in the middle of the hiring process? In real-time, we are ready to discuss your immediate concerns or issues to help you create a path of success for your personal and professional life.

 

January 2010 Newsletter Image 2Myth: All clients are created equal.

Being selective will help you optimize your business performance and steer you and your staff away from the energy-draining client.

Consider how the 80/20 rule applies. You earn 80% of your profits from the top 20% of your clients. On the other side, 80% of your headaches and problems can be traced back to the lower 20% of your client base. It is here that you need to focus your attention.

 

If prospects clearly don’t fit and will become the energy-draining client, learn to say no. And work on saying goodbye to unpleasant and unprofitable clients. If they are a real burden to your employees and organization, have the courage to “fire” them.

 

By freeing up your staff and resources, your business can focus on attracting the profitable client and providing more time, attention and value to existing clients.

This month’s Squash the Myth was adapted from a Growth Coach® franchise newsletter.

On August 27, we invite you to experience coaching with us and attend a group coaching workshop. You deserve a day-long retreat. Let us help you redirect your energies, personally and professionally. 

Question mark imageDo you feel bogged down by clutter?

Let the Success Trek team help you gain perspective on the issue(s) that challenge you. 

 

Most people are about as happy as they make up their minds to be.

 

Abraham Lincoln

 

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